Thread Theory

Welcome to the new era of menswear sewing. Go ahead and create something exceptional!


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Fabric Sale!

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Despite the knee high snow and driving icy rain outside, I know Spring will be on its way soon!  It’s time to clear the studio shelves a little so that I have room to order our Spring Fabric Collection!  Our entire selection of fabric is currently 15% off – so if you have been tempted to order some Dintex rain jacket fabric or some beautiful merino wool, now is your final opportunity!

Use the discount code WINTERFABRIC upon checkout to receive 15% off any fabric in your shopping cart.  The sale is for this weekend only!

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Once most of these fabrics are sold out we won’t be restocking them any time soon since I will be choosing a new selection of fabrics that work well with our sewing patterns each season.  We are already sold out of many of the Dintex colors…but there are still some great options available!

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It isn’t only the Fall and Winter fabrics that are on sale…all of our fabric is!  The very high quality Canadian-made knit fabrics that I have stocked since the launch of our menswear supply shop in Nov. 2015 are also 15% off right now!

I just sewed Matt a new Finlayson Sweater using the black sweatshirt fleece.  As long as Matt stays well away from our white-haired pup, Luki, I think he looks really smart in this pure black fleece!  It’s the warmest sweater in our closet so I’ve been wearing it quite a bit lately too.

It makes me happy and reassured to think that no aspect of this sweater was created outside of Canada.  The people who manufactured this fabric work in excellent conditions with fair pay.  And the person who manufactured the sweater (me!) certainly works in great conditions and received a Matt-made hall table in trade for this garment…I’d say that’s pretty fair pay too.

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It’s very difficult to convey how luxurious these Canadian-made fleece, interlock and ribbing fabrics are using photos since they are all solid colors that may just look like any other knit when photographed.  As soon as you feel the density of the interlock or the incredibly plush wrong side of the sweatshirt fleece, you will know what I mean!  I have been told by a number of sewists who have ordered these knits from us that they are reminiscent of the thickness and quality of pure cotton knits in the 1970s.  A t-shirt made in the interlock or a sweatshirt made in the fleece will last for MANY years of heavy wear.

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I hope this fabric sale has come at a good time for you!  Maybe you can squeeze in a couple more cozy winter projects before the weather warms?

Peruse our fabric selection >

Don’t forget to use the 15% off discount code!  It’s WINTERFABRIC.


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What type of fabric should I use for the Lazo Trousers?

It was lots of fun yesterday to receive all of your emails, blog comments and Instagram comments about our Lazo Trousers release!  As always, thank you so much for letting me know how excited you are to sew our patterns and also for asking all manner of questions before you delve in.  Your questions are helping me to direct my upcoming posts about the Lazos…so keep them coming!  Today I’m going to answer what is always the most pressing question when we launch a pattern: What fabric should I use?

The Lazos are a bit of a wild card when it comes to styling.  Depending on your fabric choice they can appear dressy, casual, cozy, or even a touch rugged.  Over the last few years I’ve sewn airy versions that are best for the hottest days of summer.  This is my favourite summery version in tencel (I added a big statement bow to the waist).  Of all my versions, I really cant beat these ones for comfort!

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My sweatpant version was a close contender though 😛  I hacked the Lazos while I was in school to create heather grey sweatpants with a satin ribbon draw string (that’s the only pair I’ve actually worn out…I guess that says something about my dressing habits!).  A sweatpant hack will be on the blog in January as part of our Lazo Hack contest!

I’ve also created some active wear cropped Lazos that were intended for summer hiking using a poly twill.  Photos of these will be on the blog soon (once Matt has had a chance to photograph me).

Lastly, of course, you can’t beat the classic ‘work’ trousers in a wool blend suiting:

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Can you see what I mean about the pattern being a wild card?

So, when you ask what sort of fabric you should use…the answer is not a quick one!  Let’s dig in:

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Within the instruction booklet I recommend the following:

Light to medium weight fabrics that drape nicely. These trousers are especially comfortable if the fabric contains a small percentage of spandex for stretch.  Keep in mind that the pleats will look best if you choose a fabric that presses crisply. Great choices include suiting fabrics, tencel or rayons, crepe de chine and peach skin.  Self fabric or light weight wovens can be used for the waistband facing. Pocketing or tightly woven cotton can be used for the pocket lining.

The main information to take from this paragraph is the recommended weight, drape, stretch, and pressing ease of the fabric.  I’ll elaborate on these criteria without actually naming any types of fabric.  That way you can get a deeper understanding of what properties you are looking for.  If you’re excited to get shopping and just want some actual fabric options, scroll down to find them near the end of this post!

Weight

Most trouser patterns call for mid to heavy weight fabrics but the Lazo Trousers do not.  If anything, I recommend choosing something on the lighter side!  The reason I recommend light to medium weight fabrics is because there is a considerable amount of fabric situated across the belly and thighs – there are pockets, pleats, and an overlapping wide waistband all in one small area!  Using a lighter weight fabric, regardless of its ability to press or drape, will help to ensure that the Lazos do not look bulky across the lower tummy and upper thighs.  A light to medium weight fabric is more likely to sit close to the skin softly rather than fold and buckle rigidly.  Lastly, a light weight fabric matches the look and feel of a super comfortable full gathered maxi skirt that was my inspiration for this design.

If you want to experiment and choose a heavier weight fabric, make sure that it drapes very nicely – it will work best if it is loosely woven and soft.  This raw silk version of the Lazos is the thickest fabric I have used but it is very light and soft because it is loosely woven.  The waistband is fairly bulky and, I think, looks best with an un-tucked shirt as a result.

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Drape

In my opinion, soft drape (sometimes called ‘good drape’) is the most important criteria for the Lazo Trousers.  As my instructor always said in design school, drape is a deceivingly tricky thing to quantify and understand.  Essentially, drape is the way a fabric hangs on the body.  There is a very informative blog post about drape on the blog “Cucicucicoo”.  Lisa has included an excellent selection of pictures showing ‘good’ drape fabrics vs. “low” drape fabrics.  Here is an example from her post:

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I think the Lazos look consistently best, regardless of fabric type, when the fabric wants to form itself to the body’s shape and fall fluidly towards the ground.  Choosing a fabric with soft drape will encourage the pleats to sit closely against the legs, ensure the waistband looks smooth and perfectly formed to the curve of the waist, and allow the legs to remain smooth and crease-free.

If you are feeling like experimenting, I would love for you to prove me wrong about drape!  The only Lazos I have sewn with a stiff, rigid fabric are the cotton muslin samples that I sewed while developing the pattern!  I imagined the design to be soft and fluid so I was never inclined to sew structured trousers. If you end up sewing with a stiffer fabric, be prepared to accept some wrinkles after sitting and a bit of volume from the pleats (this isn’t necessarily a bad thing depending on the look you are going for!  Maybe your going for the chic 1920’s look featuring voluminous jodhpurs?).

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(Source: The Maryland Historical Society)

Stretch

The Lazo Trousers are designed for fabrics with no stretch but that doesn’t mean you need to avoid stretchy fabrics!  Sew them in a fabric with a little bit or spandex or even in a very stable knit!  Many suiting fabrics and bottom weight fabrics contain about 6% spandex these days – these would result in a very comfortable pair of Lazos!  The waistband is very closely fitted so you will not need to size down to accommodate for stretch.

With some modifications to the pattern, a stable ponte de roma or sweatshirt fleece make for creat Lazos (the sweatpant hack I was mentioning).  Don’t try to sew the waistband as drafted (without my upcoming mods) in a knit fabric though – there wouldn’t be enough structure for the centre front overlap to look nice and crisp.  You could try sewing a woven waistband and cotton legs though!  Oooh, that would be comfortable!

Press Crisply

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I encourage you to choose a fabric that presses nicely so that your pleats look crisp and professional.  At the same time, you will probably want to avoid fabrics that wrinkle exceptionally quickly since the loose legs may become creased when you sit down.  Some gentle creasing (just as you will notice on most wide leg trousers) is just fine…but you don’t want to choose fabrics that crease at the slightest provocation.  Test a fabric by bunching it up in your fist and letting it warm in your closed hand.  Release the bunch and examine it to see if it falls flat or if it remains a crumpled ball.  If the fabric does not remain entirely smooth but only has light creasing, it will still work for the Lazos!


Now that you’ve read my reasoning, here are my top fabric picks for the Lazos.

Tencel

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I cannot recommend Tencel enough for the Lazos.  Indeed, I designed the Lazos with this specific moss green fabric already purchased and sitting happily in my fabric stash (it was fueling my imagination!).  My favourite source for Tencel is Blackbird Fabrics, an online fabric shop based out of Vancouver.  Caroline currently has two weights stocked in her shop – both would be excellent choices for the Lazo.  The above green version is similar to her lighter weight option (though I purchased the green fabric from a shop near my school years ago).

Here is a navy blue Tencel that she currently has in stock:

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She describes this as a twill with a unique brushed surface and suede like texture.  It has very good drape and just enough body to hide bumps that you don’t want to show.

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I have just finished sewing myself a pair of Christmas Lazos in Blackbird Fabric’s slightly heavier tencel twill.  They are dreamy!  The twill weave is a bit more pronounced with this fabric.  I look forward to showing my Christmas outfit to you in a future post!

There are quite a few beautiful colors (in both weights) within the Blackbird Fabrics online shop.  I am tempted by the camel color for my next pair!

Suiting

If you plan to sew the Lazos in a suiting material, be aware that there are MANY suiting fabric styles with all manner of properties.  Not all of them will work well!  Make sure to choose a light weight suiting that drapes well.  To give you an idea of what I mean: It should be thin enough and soft enough that you would need to add a LOT of interfacing and structure if you were to use it for a blazer.  Stylemaker Fabrics (an online shop based in the US) is an excellent online source for beautiful yet affordable suitings. Here are my top 3 picks!

Pick one is a solid brown stretch suiting featuring polyester, rayon and lycra.  The polyester would make this fabric hard wearing, the rayon would allow the fabric to drape softly, and the lycra would make for a super comfortable waistband!  The brown is a nice versatile colour.  The other solid is a rayon and lycra stretch twill in wine.  The rich colour paired with the beautiful drape of rayon would make for a very dressy pair of trousers.  My third pick is this statement Shepherd’s Check!  It features polyester and rayon (so there is no stretch).

I had actually purchased this fabric to make a pair of Lazos inspired by English riding attire but it got swallowed in my fabric stash and I just recently unearthed it to create a vest for Matt (the first sample of a future menswear pattern!)!  If I wasn’t told that it has no wool in it, I would never believe it!  It feels luxurious and high quality.

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I have a bit of (likely) unwanted advice for you…You may have noticed that I have not featured any wool suitings.  I am a huge wool enthusiast so, if you are too and can source lovely light weight wools, please go ahead and cut into your bounty to create some Lazos!  Before you go crazy trying to find the right wool (I have a hard time sourcing nice light wools), consider this:  If you like your clothes to wear well without much special treatment, choose a polyester blend suiting.  I know many sewists steer clear of poly blends in favour of pure wool, but this is a situation where a bit of polyester will be very beneficial!  A wool or rayon and poly blend is a good choice for trousers because it withstands abrasion and remains looking new (without special care) for longer than pure wool.  Even more important for the Lazos:  Wool/poly blends generally drape better than pure wool suiting materials.  An added bonus is that blended suitings are generally very easy to source and are quite affordable!

Bottom Weight Fabrics with Texture

My last fabric category to discuss today is a grab bag…really this category is just a mish mash of all my crazy ideas to help you ignite ideas of your own.  I have found that the Lazo Trousers are a great canvas for light weight fabrics with unusual textures!  As long as you can ensure the fabric has the weight and drape we have discussed, why not try rich velvet, adventurous faux suede, airy rayon crepe or matte peachskin?

All fabrics from Stylemaker. Top to Bottom, Left to Right: Faux Suede, Jacquard, Peachskin, Metallic Rayon Crepe, Chevron Rayon Crepe, Bold Rayon Crepe, Cranberry Stretch Velvet

These options are untested by me but I think, based on my experimenting over the last few years, they could be stunners!  The rayon crepes would create summery Lazos similar to my Tencel versions.  The Faux Suede would definitely create that safari look that I mentioned!  I purchased the black Jacquard to make myself a pair of Lazos…it remains languishing in my stash but it will emerge one day!  It has the lowest drape of all these choices and would definitely create voluminous pleats.  I think this would result in a great silhouette for New Year’s parties!  Last, but certainly not least, the stretch velvet is beckoning to me…how about you?  Of course, the pleats would not press well and working with velvet would require some careful forethought…I think I would convert the double pleats to one large pleat on each side of the fly and leave the folds unpressed so as not to crush the velvet.  I would also add a lot of interfacing to the waistband and cut the waistband facing from a thin cotton to add structure.


I hope I have your creative juices flowing!  Send me a link or a photo of the fabric you are considering and I will give you my opinion :).

Next week I will be sharing my inspiration and styling photos on the blog.  That should be a fun post!

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To close for tonight, I want to remind you of the Lazo Hack contest!  It will run the rest of December and all of January.  I had intended to explain it further in this blog post but this has become rather long…stay tuned for a small post of it’s own next week.


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The Winter Fabric Collection is here (along with more Dintex!)

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The Thread Theory fabric shop is ready for cold weather!  Meet the cozy capsule collection of winter fabrics:

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These fabrics were chosen so that you can bundle up without feeling like a stuffed sausage.  They are light weight, breathable, extra soft and COZY!

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We’ve stocked this tiny collection with a total of 5 perfect layering fabrics.  Let’s start with outerwear and work our way inwards.

Outer Layer

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This is a wool blend outerwear fabric suited to wet and stormy West Coast weather!  It is actually a Dintex fabric just like the softshell fabric that you guys like so much (more on that fabric later).  The outer layer is a rich warm charcoal knit comprised of hard wearing acrylic and poly blended with wool.  The middle layer is waterproof, windproof and breathable Dintex, and the inner layer is a light weight fleece which is perfect built in insulation.  The end result is not very bulky but would make for an incredibly warm and classy Goldstream Peacoat or Newcastle Cardigan.

If you are like me and hate when lint and dog fur sticks to fabric, I would recommend lining your coat or sweater.  The cozy inner fleece layer tends to pick up bits and might stick to your sweater or shirt.  I think it is best suited to act as a warm layer of insulation rather than a smooth lining.

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Middle Layer

Working our way inwards, the next layer in our winter collection is a luxurious terrycloth sweatshirt knit!

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This warm oatmeal colored 100% cotton terry features a beautifully subtle herringbone design on both the right and wrong side.  Despite how cozy and appealing terry cloth is, I usually avoid it because I find the loose loops on the wrong side of the fabric to be quite annoying and prone to catching on nails or watches and jewellery.  That’s why this terry cloth really gets me excited!  The wrong side is even better than the right side – it doesn’t have loose loops and instead features herringbone ridges of deliciously soft fuzz.  The ridges feel somewhat like velour (VERY SOFT).  You can see the ridges on the top right in the photo collage above.

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This fabric is 300 gsm which means it is not very bulky and will be easy to sew on any machine.  It is an ideal fabric choice for the Newcastle Cardigan or the Finlayson Sweater.

I’ve also stocked the matching ribbing for your hem bands, cuffs and necklines (pictured on the bottom right in the photo collage above).  This ribbing would also pair nicely with the heathered almond bamboo/cotton jersey that we’ve carried in the shop for quite some time.


Base Layer

Now, speaking of bamboo/cotton jersey let’s talk about the base layer in this collection!  We’ve carried quite a few solid colors of bamboo/cotton jersey in our shop ever since we launched the Comox Trunks kit.  The Comox Trunks were designed for this hard wearing, beautifully soft work horse of a fabric.  Well, when I was in Vancouver attending the Association of Sewing and Design Professionals vendor market two weekends ago, I was excited to chat with one of our fabric distributors and find out that my favorite fabric is now available in Breton stripes!

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I’ve added classic navy and white as well as a more sedate heather grey and navy to this winter collection.

 

These fabrics are ideal for any garment that will sit closely against the skin because they breath wonderfully and are so amazingly soft.  They also withstand constant washing and drying like a champ!

I’m imagining these two stripes sewn up into our free Arrowsmith Undershirt pattern, trunks and, of course, classic Breton Tees (the Hot Patterns Weekender Breton Top will be back in stock in our shop soon!).

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Dintex Fabric

As you may have noticed, the winter capsule collection is particularly small.  The entire collection is comprised of only five pieces because I wanted to save room in the budget for a big order of a rainbow of Dintex colors!

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This softshell fabric has such beautiful color options!  I know we are a menswear supply shop…but who could resist that plum color?  I was really wanting to add olive to this collection but unfortunately, olive isn’t available at this time.  I hope it will be in the future!

I hope you enjoy my winter fabric choices.  Head on over to the supply shop to check them out in more detail. >


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Waterproof Anorak Sewing Project

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I have a whopper of a sewing project to show you today!  I sewed Matt a waterproof, windproof and breathable anorak jacket and I couldn’t be happier with how it turned out!

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I used the Hot Patterns Hemmingway Windcheater pattern that we stock in our shop and modified it to be unlined as per Matt’s request.  He really wanted a light shell with lots of room for bulky sweaters underneath.  He chose the Pumpkin Dintex waterproof/windproof/breathable fabric from our shop because he wanted a jacket that would be very visible while hiking and hunting in the forest (safety first!).  Plus…he looks awesome in orange :D.  This fabric is comprised of three layers – a soft shell exterior, a waterproof film, and a mesh interior.

I was so thrilled with how easy the Dintex material was to work with.  I just used a regular old needle (probably quite dull) and I even did a bunch of stitch ripping with no bad results.  I just rubbed my finger over the needle holes and they disappeared completely.  The fabric is quite thin and very stable so it was basically like sewing quilting cotton…no stretching or slipping while I sewed.  It doesn’t fray at all so I could have left all of the seams unfinished if I had wanted to without the need for a serger or even pinking shears.

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Matt went out into a rainstorm last night for the sole purpose of testing out the waterproof nature of this fabric.  We haven’t sprayed it with any waterproofing spray and I didn’t wash it before I sewed the jacket.  He stood in torrential rain for several minutes and then shook vigorously before coming back inside.  The majority of the raindrops shook right off of him leaving him with a few drops on his shoulders and the rest of the coat completely dry.  We noticed that the drops left on his shoulders slowly started to sink into the outer layer of fabric but they did not penetrate the middle layer (which is supposed to be the main waterproof layer within this material anyways).  I think a quick spray with something like Kiwi Protect-All would fully waterproof the outer soft-shell layer of fabric.

Based on my experience with the fabric after this project (and how pro the results look…if I do say so myself!), I plan to stock a few more colors when we order our winter collection of fabrics.  There is a gorgeous teal color called Ocean and a great muted blue called Storm that are high on my list.  I’ve received a request for the color Plum.  Do you have any specific colors in mind?

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I have been steadily working on this jacket for a few weeks now with Matt eagerly awaiting it!  He has been drenched in several Fall rainstorms so far with no waterproof jacket in his closet.  He spends lots of time outdoors rain or shine while hiking with Luki, foraging for mushrooms or hunting so this garment is really an essential item for him.

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Apparently, I’m not the only one who things sewing an anorak is a great idea this Fall!  Heather Lou from Closet Case Files just launched her spectacular Kelly Anorak on October 5th.  She basically read my mind with this pattern – it is unlined with all sorts of beautiful seam finishes.  Like I said before, I didn’t use the lining pattern pieces for Matt’s anorak and instead drafted facings and improvised seam finishes.  Now that the Kelly pattern is available it would be easy to sew a menswear anorak using the Hot Pattern pieces/menswear sizes and the instructions from the Kelly!  Maybe I’ll sew a matching Kelly for myself using our Navy Dintex now that I have all the details worked out.

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Now, let’s talk a bit more about the Hemmingway Windcheater pattern.  I sewed the size Medium for Matt even though he usually wears a Small.  We chose to move up a size to ensure there was room for lots of layering.  I made a very quick and dirty mock up of the pattern to make sure that the shoulders were not too oversized (they weren’t) and, when I tried it on him, we decided to taper the side seams since Matt’s hips are very narrow and he is used to a slim fit.  I made no other fit adjustments.  Usually I would lengthen sleeves about 1-2″ when sewing for Matt but this was unnecessary because we went up a size.

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I had fun working out all the details for this jacket.  The instructions are quite brief and I didn’t follow them very often because I was not constructing the lining.  This left me with lots of creative room to add cozy jersey facings:

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…tonnes of flat felled seams and a facing on the hood:

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…as well as a waistband casing:

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I struggled finding hardware that I liked because Matt tends to like rustic or even old fashioned fastenings.  We also wanted everything to be heavy duty and hard wearing.  I bought brass snaps from Prym which I was very pleased with.  They come with a tool set that includes a plastic holder into which you place the hole punch and various applicators.

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This was very nice to work with because it kept my fingers away from the hammer and lined the top and bottom applicators up for me.  Usually I feel as though I am all thumbs when working with the tiny tools that come with snaps…but not this time!

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I like that these snaps are smaller in diameter than the ones that I usually see in fabric stores.  These little guys are 12mm in diameter.  I think this makes the jacket look more professional.

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I’m considering stocking these sets in the shop.  Would you be interested in using them for your outerwear projects?

I did not find toggles or draw string stops that I liked…but these will be easy to find when I make an anorak for myself!  Closet Case Files released a kit yesterday that includes all of the (high quality) hardware that you need to sew an anorak.  Everything would be suited to menswear except for the draw string stops (which are a beautiful scalloped design).

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For Matt’s drawstring toggles, I created circular leather disks from an old belt.  I traced a circle, cut it out, and then smoothed the edges with rough sand paper.  I used the punch from my snap kit to create two holes in the disk and then threaded the cord through them.  Hot Patterns suggested this as a solution for toggles and I love the vintage look!  They slide along the cord nicely too.  To finish the cord ends until I find a better solution, I just knotted the cord and melted the ends.

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One of the things I really like about the design of this garment is the internal drawstring along the waist.  I think this results in a more masculine and streamline look than the usual drawstring that exits near center front through an exterior grommet.

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I also find the pockets with box pleats to be very practical.  Matt can fit Luki’s leash in one of them no problem and they are more than large enough to keep his hands warm.  I lined Matt’s pockets with leftover ripstop fabric for a pop of hidden color.

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I also really love the cuff design!  It includes a tab that cinches over a sleeve gusset.  The pattern suggests to apply two snaps so that the cuff can be cinched tight against the wind.

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You can’t see the gusset well in these photos unfortunately but there is a handy close up illustration on the front of the pattern envelope.  The illustration really helped to make things clear while I sewed.  It’s basically a diamond shaped wedge of fabric that gets folded in half and sewn to the cuff and sleeve to create a flared sleeve.  The tab then cinches the cuff tight so that the sleeve, when done up, is no longer flared.  The flare will allow Matt to put on his jacket while wearing a sweater with bulky sleeves and even while he is wearing gloves.

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The hem length is perfect.  There is nice coverage over the bum!

 

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And the tall neckline is super cozy without being excessive.  Matt doesn’t have to push fabric away from his face but, if he wants to hide from the wind, he can sink behind the collar a bit like a turtle lol.

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The shape of the neckline where the hood meets the yoke is very unique:

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It provides an interesting seamline to decorate with all sorts of topstitching.  I fell a bit short here as, while I was constructing the jacket I thought this seam would usually be hidden by the hood and collar – it turns out Matt mostly wears the jacket zipped to the top leaving my one area of iffy topstitching fully exposed!  Woops!

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The last design element that really makes this anorak seem like a high end store bought coat from Patagonia or Arc’teryx is the flap that snaps over the zipper to protect the wearer fully from the wind.  This was an essential design feature for us because I couldn’t source any of those fancy waterproof and windproof zippers that I see on expensive waterproof activewear (such as this).

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Well, there you have it!  Matt’s Hemmingway Windcheater that will have him ready for anything this wet West Coast winter!


Before I sign off for today, I have a couple more things to add to this already super long post!

  • Have you seen the awesomely colorful Strath that Duncan Carter (a contestant on last season’s The Great British Sewing Bee) shared on the Minerva Crafts blog?
  • The tissue version of the Fairfield Button-up launches next Monday, Oct. 17th!  Make sure you are signed up for our newsletter because I will be sending out a special discount for newsletter recipients on Monday morning.

Have a lovely weekend!


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Layer up for Fall: Meet the new fabric collection!

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Are you ready to layer up against the chill of Fall?  We are!  I’ve freshly stocked our shop with another mini-collection of fabrics.  The summer collection was a big hit with many of you.  We sold out of a few of the Hemp/Organic cottons quickly, re-ordered, and then promptly sold out again!  Sorry to those of you who tried to order some for yourself when we were already out of stock (we still have the grey plain and striped versions though!).  I hope to bring in the same fabrics next Summer if they are still available.fall-menswear-fabrics-4-of-16

While the Summer collection was all about breezy shirting options, our Fall collection has been designed for cozy layering.  Whether you hope to create a comfortable base layer or high-tech outerwear, this collection has you covered.  Let me introduce these possibilities to you:
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Your Base Layer Options:

As an enthusiastic skier (we live in the same town as a world class ski hill!), I appreciate the comfort of Merino wool as a base layer.  We have stocked ultrafine 100% Merino in two gorgeous colors: Moroccan Blue
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…and Heathered Charcoal.fall-menswear-fabrics-22-of-12

This luxurious fabric is ideal for Comox Trunks (you could lengthen the legs to make long johns as many customers have successfully done!) or a Strathcona Tee (either long sleeve or short sleeve).  Merino wool wicks away moisture to keep your skin dry and comfortable when you are sweating.  It allows you to stay warm in cold environments and cool in warm environments.  It is the perfect choice for hiking and skiing.

Your Second Layer:

Depending on your lifestyle and sewing plans, you might like to wear your Merino base layer underneath something sporty or something dressy.  I included both options in the Fall Collection!  Layer up with more Merino by sewing a light but very cozy long sleeve top or sweater out of the Merino blend double knit.
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This thicker fabric is also available in Moroccan Blue or Heathered Charcoal so that you can mix and match with it’s lighter 100% Merino counterpart.  This fabric is light enough to be worn as a long sleeve Strathcona Henley but could also be sewn into a thin yet cozy Finlayson Sweater.  The black poly-blend backing is extremely silky and soft so it will be comfortable against the skin and will not cling or catch if you are wearing a base layer (I hate when two layers of fabric cling together and make me feel claustrophobic!).
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If you want to sew a dressier Fall piece, you might like to take a look at the Buffalo Check Shirting that I added to this collection.  It is the same delicious 100% brushed cotton that we have carried in our shop in red and black.  The red and black is no longer available from my supplier (it sold out quickly at the warehouse but we still have a few meters available in our shop!) and I suspect I will not be able to re-order these versions either.   We’ve stocked classic black and white

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…and blue and white.

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I’m pleased I managed to snag them for the Fall collection because I am loving how this fabric washes – it looks like new even after it has been washed aggressively which makes it a perfect fabric to create a Fall workshirt that you wear over everything.  It would be a nice Fairfield Button-up or maybe a Hot Patterns Workshirt.

Your Outer Layer:

I’m really excited about this last section!  I’ve included something called Dintex in our Fall collection.  This is a waterproof and windproof fabric (which is awesome) but, even better, it is also a breathable fabric.  When it is sewn into a jacket it will protect you from the elements and will not cause you to sweat!  Being from Vancouver Island, where hiking and ski jackets are our every day outerwear, I was thrilled when I found this high tech fabric!  My mind immediately conjured up all sorts of home sewn variations of incredibly expensive store bought active wear…and, crazily enough, this fabric is actually quite affordably priced!
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I’ve stocked it in a classic navy, a sedate charcoal grey, and a fun, full-on-Fall pumpkin orange.  Matt has requested a Hot Patterns Windcheater in the pumpkin color-way!

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Dintex fabric is comprised of three layers: A poly/spandex right side (it has a bit of stretch!), a 100% poly mesh wrong side (which doesn’t need a lining), and a polyurethane middle layer (which is the high tech waterproof and breathable part).
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I can’t wait to get sewing with these fabrics!  As always, please don’t be shy: Email me at info@threadtheory.ca or leave comments if you have any fabric requests for future seasonal collections!  I decided to stock the merino fabrics based on a comment left on a past blog post (thanks for the great idea, Marion!).

Happy Fall sewing, hiking, and leaf kicking!  Check out all the fabrics in our shop >

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Meet our Summer fabric collection!!!

Hemp and Cotton Shirting

Earlier this week I sent out a newsletter to introduce our mini summer collection of sustainable fabrics.  If you didn’t receive the newsletter, make sure to sign up here.  It is the best way to hear about new items in our shop the moment they are launched.

Men's shirt fabric

This Summer collection of fabric is comprised of breezy hemp and organic cotton yarn dyed fabrics that are ideal for casual summer button-up shirts (or dresses and skirts).  Many of you requested solid versions of the shirting that we launched alongside our Fairfield Button-up pattern.  Thank you for sending in your requests!  You now have four colors of solid fabric and two fabric weights to choose from.

They are going quickly already – the natural stripe and denim shirtings are just about sold out!

Summer Fabric Collection - menswear

We only ordered one roll of each fabric so they will be available for quite a limited time.  Once they sell out this season my studio shelves will be cleared for a mini Fall collection.  Any special requests for the Fall collection?  What menswear fabrics do you want to see in our shop?

 

 


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Comox Trunks Supplies Kit – New Colors, New Packaging!

Comox Trunks Supplies Kit-2

One of my favorite sort of emails to receive is from a happy customer who bought our Comox Trunks Supplies Kit.  Some of you have emailed us in the past because you are thrilled with the fabric that is included within the package – you (and I) love how soft, strong, opaque and also stretchy the beautiful bamboo cotton jersey is.  It features 66% rayon from bamboo, 28% cotton and 6% spandex.  It wears incredibly well and is also really forgiving – I’ve sewn dresses and Comox Trunks out of it without taking the time to pre-wash the fabric.  I have never experienced any shrinkage.

Obviously, based on both my opinion and the feedback we’ve received from you guys, it is high time to expand our color range for the Comox Trunks kit.  We’ve added three new colors and have also decided to list the Bamboo Cotton Jersey by the meter so that you can use it for the myriad of other projects for which it is the perfect fabric!

Here are a few of the projects for which I think this fabric is the ideal choice:

Patterns for bamboo cotton jersey fabricThe Comox Trunks by Thread Theory | The Wren Dress by Colette Patterns | The Out and About Dress by Sew Caroline | The Camas Blouse by Thread Theory | The Virginia Leggings by Megan Nielson | The Coppelia Cardigan by Papercut Patterns (the version you see here was sewn by me) | The Summer Jazz Dress by Snapdragon Studios (this dress was sewn by me using the Charcoal Bamboo Cotto – it was blogged here.| The Agnes Top by Tilly and the Buttons

Along with the new color choices, we’ve made another change to the Comox Trunks Kit:  We re-branded the Comox Trunk Kit in a biodegradable and reusable plastic bag with a label that details the kit contents and provides some information about the project.  The Comox Trunks Kit is a great gift for new sewers so I wanted to make the contents and corresponding resources (such as our Comox Trunks sew-along) a little more clear and accessible.

Here are the three new colors of fabric that we now carry in our shop and in the kit!

A dark and mysterious Forest Green which I am currently sewing into an Out and About maxi dress to wear on Christmas Day:

Bamboo Cotton Jersey by Thread Theory-11

An earthy Olive Green which is Matt’s very favorite color choice due to it’s military vibe:

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And a beautiful Heathered Almond with such a lovely sheen – I can’t wait to sew this into a Camas Blouse or Coppelia Cardigan!

Bamboo Cotton Jersey by Thread Theory-2

We still carry the two original colors that have always been available in our Comox Trunks kits: Festive Burgundy…

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… and the ever popular and masculine Charcoal:Bamboo Cotton Jersey by Thread Theory-9

Head to the Comox Trunks Supplies Kit page or the Bamboo Cotton Jersey page to have a look at the fabrics in detail.


 

An important note about Christmas shipping:

If you would like to receive your order by Dec. 21st (so that you have time to sew the Comox Trunks before Christmas), I recommend that you place your last shippable orders from our shop by this Friday, Dec. 11th.  Our most common (and affordable) shipping method is Small Packet Air.  Using this method, Canada Post states that your parcel will take 4 to 6 business days to reach you but be aware that this shipping time is not guaranteed by Canada Post so please try to order earlier rather than later to be on the safe side!