Thread Theory

Welcome to the new era of menswear sewing. Go ahead and create something exceptional!


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Your tailoring projects

Thank you for your enthusiasm over the Belvedere Waistcoat!  I’m really looking forward to seeing how your waistcoat projects turn out!

The other day, Amy, one of the helpful Belvedere test sewers, sent me a link to the blog post which featured her husband’s finished vest.  I enjoyed reading about her fit alterations, her thoughts on the garment design, and her perspective on construction methods…plus, we both agree that her very PNW photos could fit right in on our website!

I’ve also received a couple of emails lately with photos attached featuring absolutely gorgeous tailored Goldstream Peacoats.  Here is Zak’s rendition featuring a surprise lining!

Zak did a very thorough job canvasing the coat front.  He recommended a series of Youtube videos called “The Making of a Coat” by tailor Rory Duffy.  I somehow hadn’t come across Rory Duffy’s channel and am so thankful to Zak for pointing it out to me!  Duffy is a Savile Row trained Master Tailor who founded the Handcraft Tailor Academy in Ireland.  His videos are beautifully filmed and very informative.  Well worth a watch!

The second set of photos that I received was from Rachel who has been working hard over the past months to create not one, but two carefully fitted Goldstream Peacoats! She made one for each of her two sons.  Here they are looking very smart (accompanied by Rachel’s daughter-in-law).

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Thanks, Amy, Zak and Rachel, for sharing your project photos!  I hope you are as pleased with how your tailoring projects turned out as I am. 🙂

Matt and I are heading off on a camping holiday all of next week (EXCITING!!!) so I won’t be blogging next Friday…but when I’m back I will be raring to go with the Belvedere sew-along.  See you then!


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Sew a Gift this Christmas!

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Some of you might have noticed I didn’t write a blog post last Friday (my mom and my mother-in-law both joked that they worried I was ill and dying…fortunately, this was not the case!).  You guys must have some big Christmas sewing plans because, last week in particular, I spent every day madly packing up your menswear sewing supplies so I could cart them to the post office as quickly as possible.  I simply didn’t have time to prepare a blog post!

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While in line at the post office I was wearing a red wool coat, a big white scarf and had a whole shopping cart of Christmas parcels.  The man in front of me said I looked just like Mrs. Claus!  I certainly felt like a Christmas elf at least!

With Christmas gift giving on my mind, I’ve gathered together a selection of sewing inspiration to give you an extra boost as you fill all the items on your Christmas gift list.

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Let’s start with this year’s gift ideas!  Usually I do a blog post about my ideas (see last year’s and one from a couple of years ago) but this year I was invited to chat with Rachel on the Canadian podcast MakerStyle.  We talked about my top five gifts to sew for men.  Be sure to check it out – there are a couple of ideas that wouldn’t take too long to assemble so you still have time to get into the DIY gift giving spirit!

And here is some more gift inspiration for you from the Thread Theory community!  Do you see anything your husband, boyfriend, brother, son, or friend would love for Christmas?

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These two gorgeous wintery blue Fairfield Button-ups would look great worn to Christmas dinner!  On the left is a Fairfield sewn by the proprietress of the German fabric shop, Brinarina.  You can find more photos of her Fairfield on Instagram.  The close up shot of the Fairfield on the right is from Anna who just shared this beautiful photo on her Instagram account (@grosgary).

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Comox Trunks make such a fun stocking stuffer…plus they are very quick to sew and are a great way to recycle t-shirts or use up fabric scraps!  I love the whimsical fabric that @adlesim used for the pair on the left.  If you don’t end up having time to sew the trunks, no need to worry! You could take a leaf out of Jenny’s book and wrap them up as an appealing kit…maybe along with the offer to teach your recipient to sew?  Jenny sells these bright kits and finished trunks in her glorious sewing shop, the Makehouse (in Victoria, B.C.).

finlayson-sweater

The Finlayson Sweater is always the first pattern that I recommend for gift giving.  It is pretty safe to just guess a size with this boxy design!  I absolutely adore the lengthened version that Jessica made at Handcraft Workshop.  On the right is an incredibly cozy looking quilted Finlayson made by @mllechouchou.

newcastle-cardigan

The photo on the right was emailed to me by Matthew recently – he turned the Newcastle Cardigan into a classy jacket featuring herringbone cotton, bemberg lining and a lapped zipper!

And, to wrap up our show and tell, on the above left is a photo by @kristieinbc featuring her Thread Theory purchase beside a pretty basket of wintery pinecones.  This is how I like to wrap up your orders – they are sent as brown paper packages tied up in string!

The last thing I want to share today isn’t a menswear gift idea but, is instead, a heartwarming tale about a man learning to sew!  Every time I hear such a story, I feel inspired to continue with Thread Theory’s emphasis of sewing menswear.

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Christopher recently emailed me to share a link to a blog post detailing his new passion for sewing.  I HIGHLY recommend giving it a read…especially if you would like to find out how he wound up with such a gorgeous vintage Elna!


 

I really enjoy rounding up my favourites from the Thread Theory sewing community but I’m sure there are many other inspiring projects and stories out there that I’ve missed!  I have received a few requests lately to create a Facebook group for Thread Theory patterns.  I am relatively clueless when it comes to using Facebook but it seems as though this is a pretty easy and also common way to create a sewing themed discussion group or forum.  The purpose of the group would be to share your finished projects and to discuss ideas for our patterns amongst yourselves (topics could include fabric selection, modifications and questions about tricky sewing steps for instance).  Does this sound like something that would be useful to you?  From your experience, do you think Facebook is the best platform for this kind of community?  Or would you suggest a different sort of forum or community board?  I would love your input!


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Association of Sewing and Design Professionals Conference

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This Sunday Matt and I will have a Thread Theory booth set up at the Westin Wall Center in Richmond (near Vancouver, B.C.) for the annual Association of Sewing and Design Professionals Conference.  The vendor area will be open noon until 6pm and the public is welcome (even if you aren’t attending the conference).  Will any of you be able to stop by to say hi in person?

You may have heard of the Association of Sewing and Design Professionals if you read Threads Magazine.  It is an North American organisation with a mission “to support individuals engaged in sewing and design related businesses, in both commercial and home-based settings.” (I pulled that right from their website – you can read all about it here.)  Every year Threads Magazine presents the approximately 400 members with a sewing related challenge and displays the winners in their magazine…this was my first introduction to the talented professionals that are part of this organisation.  Members include recognisable names such as Susan Khalje (couture specialist) and Connie Crawford (pattern designer).  I look forward to meeting many of these talented people in person at the vendor market!

Also, no less thrilling, I will be vending alongside some other very inspiring companies (Blackbird Fabrics!  Clotho! Farthingales! Fit for Art Patterns!).

Even though I enjoy working from home with the world at my fingertips online, it can be extremely refreshing to get out and engage with the sewing industry in person.  It has been just about a year since Matt and I did our last vendor market so it is high time to pack up the car, jump on the ferry, and set up our little booth.  I look forward to a weekend of sewing talk, putting faces to names, and spreading the word about Thread Theory!  Plus…we will be doing a detour to visit Science World like the couple of geeky kids that we are. 😛


Aside from letting you know about the chance to meet face to face, I have two things to share with you today!

  1. You still have a 3 days left to email me with proof that your purchased the PDF Fairfield Button-up before the tissue pattern was released.  I will give you an $11 discount on the tissue pattern to thank you for supporting Thread Theory while you waited for us to send the design to print!  Email me at info@threadtheory.ca
  2. Speaking of the Fairfield, check out this amazing rendition!  Robynne sewed it for her husband (and also sewed her own shirt) for their anniversary photos.  Plus…their dogs are very cute in matching bandannas 🙂

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The Landgate Jacket (Unisex Pattern)

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It’s chilly and the rain is pouring down this morning.  Time for pumpkins, hooded jackets and mushroom hunting!  Nicole (my sewing friend and proprietress of The Spool Sewing Studio) created this rain jacket with Fall weather in mind.  She used The Landgate pattern by Merchant & Mills and our burnt orange cotton canvas that we include in our Bag Making Kits.

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Since I took these photos she has been working away at waxing this jacket with Otterwax in hopes of waterproofing the garment and creating the gorgeous patina that resulted when I waxed my Mom’s bag.  Of course, a jacket is a lot more work to wax than a bag so she hasn’t quite finished it yet.  She reports that she is struggling to work the wax into the fabric.  I remember, when I first finished my Mom’s bag it looked chalky, as though the wax had hardened on the surface.  I put the bag in the dryer with an old towel and was pleased with how the wax soaked in.  Nicole tried this without being satisfied with the results so we have some more experimenting to do!  Sometimes I think the best way to create a nice patina on waxed fabric is just to use the garment or bag for a while…kind of in the same way you would wear in new shoes or denim.  I will try to update you when we’ve finished the waxing process (I think I will step in and help her out since she so kindly modelled the Landgate for me!).

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Now, let’s talk more about this awesome pattern!  It is a unisex design but I’ve only seen it on women in person (but Google “Landgate Pattern” to see some amazing menswear versions!).  I shall have to get Matt to try on Nicole’s Landgate once it is fully waxed.landgate-jacket-pattern-9

This pattern features a gorgeous yoke detail paired with raglan sleeves and a deep hood which includes a tall, built in collar.

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The hood features draw strings.  The partial zip at centre front includes an insert to protect the chin and neck from the wind (and from the zipper!).  These details work together to provide ultimate protection from stormy weather. With the draw strings pulled tight and the neck zip done up you could walk into driving rain with only your eyes exposed!

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The sleeves are quite long and wide and the body is boxy which makes the jacket an excellent shell.  There is a lot of room to layer a heavy wool sweater underneath.  Nicole made a size Medium I believe – correct me if I am wrong, Nicole! – to ensure an extra roomy fit.  She also wanted to make sure there was enough length for full bum coverage when biking.

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Even though the jacket is boxy, it doesn’t need to look like a sack.  The waist drawstring can be cinched as tight as you would like.  I think it would be best kept loose or only slightly cinched if worn by a man but it looks quite flattering cinched on a woman!

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The pockets are probably my favourite detail on this jacket. There are sneaky side pockets which are set forward from the side seam.  Side seam pockets can be a tad uncomfortable to use since they are set so far back.  These are far better!  On top of these pockets are very roomy patch pockets with flaps.  I like the two pocket options because your wallet and phone can be protected in the patch pockets leaving lots of room for your hands in the other pockets.landgate-jacket-pattern-13

The Landgate is unlined as you can see in the photo below.

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Nicole did a lovely job of finishing all of the seams with her serger.  Just because a garment is unlined doesn’t mean it will  be ugly on the inside!  Check out her beautiful batik pocket linings.  The print reminds me of onions! 😀

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You did an excellent job sewing up this pattern, Nicole!  I hope your next version goes just as well (yes…she already has another one on her list of sewing project ideas!).

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You can find the Landgate pattern in our shop >


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Your Makes: Pattern Hacks and Personal Touches

I’m always so amazed by the time and thought that you put into your menswear sewing projects.  Most commonly, our customers sew our patterns for a family member (rather than themselves) so it is heartwarming to see the love put into the projects that you make for your significant others, sons, fathers, and friends!

Shelock Coat - the Goldstream Peacoat

Just recently, Blanka emailed photos of this spot-on rendition of the famous Peacoat from BBC Sherlock.  She used our Goldstream Peacoat pattern as her base and adjusted it in numerous ways to capture all of the stylish details found in Sherlock’s iconic coat.  Check out that inverted box pleat along centre back!  And the nicely structured collar which really is the essence Sherlock’s suave style.  This Peacoat truly was a labour of love – Blanka sewed it over several months for her boyfriend.  She carefully sourced the best materials from around the world (she is based in the Czech Republic and patiently waited for Gutterman Gimp thread to arrive from the UK so she could hand sew all of the buttonholes!).

SarahBrezina wedding Jedediah and Fairfield

Sarah emailed me with this excellent photo of her and her husband at her brother’s wedding recently.  They are wearing co-coordinating handmade outfits!  Sarah is wearing a glamorous version of the Sewaholic Davie Dress and her husband is sporting awesome plaid Jedediah Pants and a linen Fairfield Button-up.  Sarah mentioned that this is her 14th pair of Thread Theory trousers (!!!) and also that she expects to sew many Fairfield shirts for family members in the future.  Wow…she is prolific!

Thank you, Blanka and Sarah (and all of the others) who have shared your Thread Theory projects with me via email!  Reading about your happy experiences with our patterns and seeing the pride on each wearer’s face as they sport handmade outfits is what it is all about for me.  Email me at info@threadtheory.ca if you would like to chat sewing and share!

 

There have been some great makes popping up on Instagram lately too.  Here is a smattering for you to enjoy!  If you would like to see more, try searching a few of these hashtags:

 

#makemenswear #threadtheorydesigns #threadtheory #fairfieldbuttonup #finlaysonsweater #camasblouse (and any of our other pattern names).  Have fun!

 

I've made Joe a shirt.. I guess I should stop wearing it and give it to him #fairfieldbuttonup

A post shared by Hayley John (@hayleyjohn_5) on

a lil cheesy but something in progress for my dad! #fairfieldbuttonup #threadtheory

A post shared by Jessie Stern (@jessiestern) on

#sewingunderwear #boxers #comoxtrunks #vankatoen #stipjesendatjes father and son

A post shared by Stipjes en datjes (@stipjesendatjes) on

 

Let’s finish off this post with a great sewing hack.  If you want to sew the Comox Trunks pattern but can’t source wide enough elastic (or you would like to play with some color combinations), try stitching two narrow elastics together.  Narrow elastic is available in many colors in most fabric shops.  You might even be able to find some fun prints.  Excellent idea, Naii!  I hope your Comox Trunks turn out well!

 


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The perks of being married to a sewing instructor.

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Back in April, my sewing friend, Nicole (proprietress of The Spool Sewing Studio) was on a sewing spree which included some fresh Strathcona Tees for her husband, Scott.  Scott graciously agreed to model my favorite of the selection so that I could have a small backlog of garments to show you for a busy week just like this one (we are renovating and moving the Thread Theory studio into our new home).

So, without further ado, here is Scott’s charcoal Strathcona T-shirt:

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The neckline is finished with a self fabric band and the hems are finished with a twin needle.  The sleeves have been shortened very slightly to suit Scott’s preferred length and the hem has been left at full length to suit his long torso.  He loves the length of the Strath since he often struggles with the fit of boxy, short store bought tees.

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Nicole, always an enthusiastic ‘pusher’ of the Thread Theory brand, stitched our garment tag to the hem so that she (and Scott) can continue to spread the word about sewing menswear.  Isn’t it great to have friends who operate voluntarily as a marketing team?!  Thanks Scott and Nicole!

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By the way, the Strathcona Henley pattern is currently sold out in its paper format!  It is still available as a PDF though.  Matt and I are working on getting some quotes to reprint it.  We hope it will be available in the shop once more by the end of the summer (if the quotes are affordable!).


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Happy Father’s Day!

There are only 2 hours left for you to receive 50% off of all our PDF patterns!

I hope your Father’s Day has been filled with loving Father/Daughter or Father/Son bonding time.

Father's Day Gift Sewing

Matt and his Dad sported matching Fairfield Button-ups today – Matt wore the plaid flannel one (his favorite) and Rick wore a gorgeous white linen Fairfield that Matt’s mom just finished sewing!  Rick will be wearing it to Matt’s brother’s wedding this July.  She sewed a band collar and added buttons to the sleeve plackets.  It’s the perfect cross between dressed-up and summer casual (to suit the tone of the wedding).    He’s holding the plane Matt gave him today (cute!).

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Happy Father’s Day!