Thread Theory

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My Mother-In-Law’s latest Thread Theory sewing projects

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Three Camas Blouses Thread Theory

In case you are a relatively new follower of the Thread Theory blog, let me introduce to you Sue, my mother-in-law!  She is a talented sewist who sewed quite a lot in the past, stopped sewing for many years and then picked up the skill again when we launched our first patterns.  She has since sewn many renditions of our designs and has even contributed to the blog!  You can read her first blog post from Thanksgiving 2013 here.  Above is a photo of Sonia (our graphic designer and my future sister-in-law), Sue and I bedecked in Camas Blouses on Thanksgiving this year.  Apparently the modelling of Thread Theory sewing projects is becoming a Thanksgiving tradition!  Sue sewed both Sonia’s blouse and her own and I sewed the one I’m wearing last winter.

Our photoshoot was complete with a photobomb:Three Camas Blouses Thread Theory-6

This is Charlie – Matt’s grandparent’s very rambunctious and adorable puppy!Three Camas Blouses Thread Theory-4

All three Camas Blouses are really unique – the outer two are sewn using slightly gauzy and light sweater knits and Sue’s features a very drapey and dense viscose knit.  I love how each print suits our personalities:
Three Camas Blouses Thread Theory-8

Recently Sue had another Thread Theory project on her sewing table.  She created a pair of dressy trousers for her husband in time for a cruise holiday.  They are the result of combining both the Jedediah and Jutland Pants patterns.  She did quite a bit of pattern manipulating for this project and took the time to write down some of the thoughts and challenges that occurred as the project progressed.  As I’m sure most sewists will agree, it is always very interesting and also relatable to read about the sewing thought process so I’m very glad that she’s shared hers with us!

Without further ado, here is Sue to explain her project:


I wanted to make a pair of dress pants for my hubby and had found a lovely light to medium weight wool blend material  that I thought would be perfect for the project, but I didn’t have a dress pant pattern. I had already made a semi-casual pair of Jeds for him, that he loved the fit and comfort of, so I had that pattern and the Jutland pattern.

The thought occurred to me that I could combine the two patterns to get what I wanted. My aim was to have front slash pockets like the Jeds, back welt pockets like the Jutlands, and a leg width somewhere between the two. I at first started to try to match the front of the Jeds pattern to the back of the Jutlands, and was struggling with it. Then I talked with Morgan (why I didn’t do that in the first place I don’t know) who reminded me of a previous post by Roni describing how to modify the Jeds pattern to remove the yoke, and add welt back pockets…perfect! So, I followed those instructions, and also widened the legs from above the knees down to the hem. Morgan also suggested that I do a mock-up first to ensure a correct fit, but I was limited by a deadline (wanted to get them done before our cruise), so I forged ahead and hoped for the best.

I wanted to end up with a professional finished look to the pants, so tried my best to do the fine finishing touches suggested in the patterns. So I used bias tape to finish the seams, and french seamed the front pockets.

Trousers 1

Like Roni, I couldn’t figure a way to do a french seam on the rear pockets, so I just used the nicest finishing stitch I could find on my machine that worked with the material.

Trousers 5

I knew I didn’t want flat felled seams on the legs as that was too casual a look for these pants. As well, this material was starting to fray quite a bit, and I had troubles with fraying and getting a good flat felled seam on a previous project. So in the end, I decided to do french seams for the outer leg seams, and then a standard seam and zig zag finish on the inner leg seam. I was really happy with the french seam finish on the outer leg, but not so happy with the zig zag finish on the inner leg, as my material tended to bunch up. In hindsight I think I should have had some kind of stabilizer on the material to do the finishing of the edge.

Trousers 7

Trousers 6
The last modification I did was to use the waistband from the Jutland pattern so that I could sew the belt loops into the upper seam and lower seam when I attached the waistband to the  waist of the pant, for a more finished look. I later hand stitched the bottom of the loop to hold it in place against the upper pant.

Trousers 2
Trousers 3

Both my husband and I are very pleased with the end result, and he has worn his pants with pride while on the cruise and many times since. These are a couple  photos  of the final product.

Trousers 8

All in all a very successful project. What I learned: If you are thinking of modifying a pattern, talk to Morgan before you start, she may have some valuable suggestions that can save you a lot of time and energy! (Note from Morgan: Yes, please do contact me if you are wanting help with a project or just a chance to mull over your ideas with someone!  Email me at info@threadtheory.ca)


 

Thank you for taking the time to write a blog post for us Sue!  The results of your thoughtful sewing are, as always, very professional and very wearable!

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6 thoughts on “My Mother-In-Law’s latest Thread Theory sewing projects

  1. This is a great looking pair of pants. I’ve hacked the Jedediah pattern multiple ways, and I’ve always been pleased with the result. It is possible to create a french seamed back welt pocket. Someday I’ll have to create a tutorial for it.

  2. So much fabulous information and great work, thank you for what you’re giving us in the sewing world!

  3. I’m experiencing the same issues of fraying fabric and problematic zig-zag finishing (refashioning a pair of my husband’s pants for myself). I’m so relieved to see that the end result wasn’t affected in these pants! I was ready to throw in the towel on that project out of pure frustration, but maybe I should finish them up and see how they work out.

  4. The pants look very nice! It’s a joy to have good basic patterns, along with information to do those modifications. Even if you have an idea of how to proceed, being able to cross reference is invauable. I have seen not only this modification but one on changing the front pocket to be more like jeans. This pattern takes you from jeans to causal and now to dressy. Win win win 🙂

  5. This is a great read! I plan on making a pair of standard Jedediah Jeanslike patterns for my boyfriend, but he also requested more dressy trousers with a matching vest. So that’s on the sewing list now too. I will surely take Sue’s notes from this project into account when sewing those dressy pants!

  6. The pants are very handsome, and it was an interesting post to read about the changes you made, Sue. I always learn from posts that describe both the successes and challenges in sewing. Also, it is wonderful to see that the two Thread Theory patterns can be combine to create a new look. Just another reason to keep buying Morgan’s patterns. I have 3 patterns in my stash from Thread Theory and have made two pairs of shorts for my husband from the Jedediah pattern. He is clamoring for plants, but I have to get some sewing done for myself first! It is so nice that you have so many supportive family members who take an interest in your work, Morgan. They are very proud of you and Matt, I’m sure!

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